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Radtour Die Küste Nordirlands

Geplante Tour: Belfast-Derry

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Höhen-Profil Radtour Die Küste Nordirlands

Erstellt am 03.09.2020,

am 04.09.2020

Strecken-Merkmale

geplant

gefahren

Gesamtlänge in km

240

0

Gesamthöhenmeter Aufstieg

6.194

0

Durchschn. Steigung Aufstieg %

2,58

-

Gesamthöhenmeter Abstieg

6.190

0

GPS-Track-Daten

Informationen zu Rechten an den GPS-Track-Daten

Rechte-Inhaber

Ottocolor

Rechte-Ausprägung / Lizenz

cc0: Public Domain keine Rechte vorbehalten

Link zur Rechtebeschreibung

creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/

gpx-Datei hochgeladen

durch Ottocolor am 03.09.2020

Gesamtzahl Trackpoints

3.401

0

Trackpoint-Dichte per km

14

0

Endorte

Start

Belfast, Northern Ireland, GB (12 m NHN)

Ziel

Londonderry/Derry, Northern Ireland, GB (17 m NHN)

Charakter

Eight or nine days of cycling holiday with accommodation in hotels or B&B's. The tour is planned to be ridden with my brother Michael, possibly in 2021. Four or five days of cycling are surrounded by two rest days in Belfast and Derry, respectively and again by two days of transportation. The journey to and from Belfast will be by air and the trip back from Derry to Belfast by train. Bikes will be rented in Belfast. Right-hand drive ones, that is ;-)

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Rechte-Ausprägung / Lizenz

by-sa: CREATIVE COMMONS Namensnennung, Weitergabe unter gleichen Bedingungen

Link zur Rechtebeschreibung

creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/de/

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04.09.2020

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Landschaft

Spectacular coastal landscape along the Causeway coast of outstanding natural beauty as well as in "the nine glens of Antrim". Pictursque coastal towns and villages with lovely beaches like Glenariff, Ballycastle and Portrush. Highlights will be the northeastern cape of Ireland Torr head, Carrick-a-Rede-rope bridge, Giant's causeway, Bushmill's whiskey distillery the view from Binevinagh mountain as well as some castles and castle ruins with dramatic exposures on the cliff top. Ferry trip to Donegal in the Republic of Ireland with accommodation near Inishowen lighthouse.

The start will be in the Northern Irish capital of Belfast with its worn-out greatness and uneasy new historic past and the finish in "stroke city" Derry/Londonderry with its perfect city walls and charming location on the banks of the river Foyle. The train trip back, at places extremely close to the coast, will be an attraction in itself.

Cyclewise the landscape will be challenging with some nasty climbs, but only one long one of those (Binevinagh). In between flat coastal road, where we can rest our legs and lungs.

With four days of cycling the stages with accomodation places could be:

1. Belfast-Glenariff, 79 km

2. Glenarifff-Portballintrae, 59 km

3. Portballintrae-Inishowen lighthouse, 64 km

4. Inishowen lighthouse-Derry, 38 km

With five days of cycling the stages could be:

1. Belfast-Glenariff, 79 km

2. Glenariff-Ballycastle, 35 km

3. Ballycastle-Portballintrae, 24 km

4. Portballintrae-Inishowen lighthouse, 64 km

5. Inishowen lighthouse-Derry, 38 km.

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Rechte-Ausprägung / Lizenz

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Link zur Rechtebeschreibung

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04.09.2020

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An- und Abreise

Flight from Billund to Belfast International Airport with an interchange at London or Manchester. From there with the airport shuttle to Great Victoria Station in the city centre.

The homebound trip is planned as a one day trip from Derry to Billund an further on home with a train ride from Derry to Belfast, returning the bikes and flying to Denmark.

Fahrradfreundliche Unterkünfte, Sehenswertes und Infrastruktur

Name u. Anschrift

Breite / Länge

Tel.
Fax.
Mobile

Art d. Unterkunft

Strecken-km
km zur Strecke
Höhe über NHN

Radlerfreundlichkeit

 

4 km
2,2 km
0 m

GB-BT3 9JL Belfast

 

Fähr-Terminal/Fähre

Fähre Belfast to Cairnryan

Überfahrt nur 2 Stunden15 Minuten mit bis zu sechs Überfahrten täglich.

Einzelheiten siehe Fahrplan.

Preis etwa 50 € (Passagier und Fahrrad).

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Rechte-Ausprägung / Lizenz

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28.10.2012

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27 km
4,5 km
3 m

GB-BT38 8AA Carrickfergus

 

Burg/Schloss

Carrickfergus Castle
Carrickfergus Castle

Carrickfergus Castle (from the Irish Carraig Ḟergus or "cairn of Fergus", the name "Fergus" meaning "strong man") is a Norman castle in Northern Ireland, situated in the town of Carrickfergus in County Antrim, on the northern shore of Belfast Lough. Besieged in turn by the Scottish, Irish, English and French, the castle played an important military role until 1928 and remains one of the best preserved medieval structures in Northern Ireland. It was strategically useful, with 3/4 of the castle perimeter surrounded by water (although in modern times only 1/3 is surrounded by water due to land reclamation).

Carrickfergus was built by John de Courcy in 1177 as his headquarters, after he conquered eastern Ulster in 1177 and ruled as a petty king until 1204, when he was ousted by another Norman adventurer, Hugh de Lacy. Initially de Courcy built the inner ward, a small bailey at the end of the promontory with a high polygonal curtain wall and east gate. It had several buildings, including the great hall. From its strategic position on a rocky promontory, originally almost surrounded by sea, the castle commanded Carrickfergus Bay (later known as Belfast Lough), and the land approaches into the walled town that developed beneath its shadows.

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by-sa: CREATIVE COMMONS Namensnennung, Weitergabe unter gleichen Bedingungen

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Text(e) übernommen von:

Wikipedia contributors, 'Carrickfergus Castle', Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia, 31 December 2018, 22:59 UTC, <https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Carrickfergus_Castle&oldid=876222031> [accessed 15 January 2019]

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15.01.2019

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61 km
0,2 km
11 m

GB-BT44 0AB Glenarm

 

Burg/Schloss

Glenarm Castle
Glenarm Castle

Glenarm Castle, Glenarm, County Antrim, Northern Ireland, is the ancestral home of the Earls of Antrim.

There has been a castle at Glenarm since the 13th century, where it resides at the heart of one of Northern Ireland's oldest estates. It was owned by of John Bisset who acquired lands between Larne and Ballycastle from Hugh de Lacy, the Earl of Ulster. Bisset made Glenarm his capital, and by 1260 there was a castle, which stood at the centre of the present village, with a kitchen garden, an orchard and a mill, as well as woods and meadows. The old village courthouse still incorporates some of its walls, indeed an immured skeleton was discovered there in the 1970s. In 1495 Con O'Donnell of Tirconnell marched on ‘MacEoin of the Glens’ (as the Bisset chieftain was called), ‘for he had been told that MacEoin had the finest wife, steed and hound in his neighbourhood. O'Donnell had sent messengers for the steed but was refused it so he made no delay, but surmounting the difficulties of every passage he arrived at night at MacEoin's house without giving any warning of his designs. He captured MacEoin and made himself master of his wife his steed and his hound'. The last MacEoin Bisset was killed fighting the O'Donnells in 1522. Their lands were then seized by the MacDonnells, their former partners, who occupied the Bisset’s castle until they built the new one.


The present castle was built by Sir Randal MacDonnell, 1st Earl of Antrim, in 1636, and it has remained in the family since its construction. It is currently owned by Randal, Viscount Dunluce, the son of Alexander McDonnell, 9th Earl of Antrim. The McDonnells have been in Glenarm for nearly 600 years and the Estate has been in the family for 400 years.

Events

The Castle's Walled Garden is open to the public between May and September and hosts many events. In July of every year the grounds are the site of a world-class Highland Games. The Dalriada Festival is also held at Glenarm Castle and within the local village, which celebrates sport, music and fine food from all over Scotland and Ireland. The castle also hosts traditional Ulster Scots cultural events. As part of the Dalriada Festival, Glenarm Castle has started to host large outdoor concerts. As of 2012, it has welcomed artists like General Fiasco, The Priests, Duke Special, Ronan Keating, Sharon Corr, Brian Houston, David Phelps and the likes.

Summer Madness, Ireland's biggest Christian Festival, moved from its annual residence at the Kings Hall, Belfast, to Glenarm Castle in 2012. It is thought this festival will return to Glenarm on a yearly basis for the foreseeable future.

Informationen zu Urheber-Rechten

Rechte-Ausprägung / Lizenz

by-sa: CREATIVE COMMONS Namensnennung, Weitergabe unter gleichen Bedingungen

Link zur Rechtebeschreibung

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Text(e) übernommen von:

Wikipedia contributors, 'Glenarm Castle', Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia, 15 December 2018, 13:55 UTC, <https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Glenarm_Castle&oldid=873848868> [accessed 15 January 2019]

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15.01.2019

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121 km
0,4 km
11 m

GB-BT54 6LX Ballintoy

 

Brücke

Carrick-a-Rede Bridge
Carrick-a-Rede Bridge
Carrick-a-Rede Bridge

Carrick-a-Rede Rope Bridge (locally pronounced carrick-a-reedy) is a famous rope bridge near Ballintoy in County Antrim, Northern Ireland. The bridge links the mainland to the tiny island of Carrickarede (from Irish: Carraig a' Ráid, meaning "rock of the casting"). It spans 20 metres (66 ft) and is 30 metres (98 ft) above the rocks below. The bridge is mainly a tourist attraction and is owned and maintained by the National Trust. In 2009, it had 247,000 visitors. By 2016, that had increased to 440,000 visitors. The bridge is open all year round (subject to weather) and people may cross it for a fee.

The area is exceptional in natural beauty with stunning views of Rathlin Island and Scotland. The site and surrounding area is designated an Area of Special Scientific Interest for its unique geology, flora, and fauna. Underneath there are large caves, which once served as home for boat builders and as shelter during stormy weathe

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Rechte-Ausprägung / Lizenz

by-sa: CREATIVE COMMONS Namensnennung, Weitergabe unter gleichen Bedingungen

Link zur Rechtebeschreibung

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Text(e) übernommen von:

Wikipedia contributors, 'Carrick-a-Rede Rope Bridge', Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia, 26 December 2018, 20:19 UTC, https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Carrick-a-Rede_Rope_Bridge&oldid=875469658 [accessed 15 January 2019]

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134 km
0,8 km
0 m

GB-BT57 8SU County Antrim

 

Naturdenkmal/Weltkulturerbe

Giant’s Causeway
Giantʹs Causeway
Giantʹs Causeway

Giant's Causeway (Irish: Clochán an Aifir) is a spectacular rock formation on the Antrim coast of Northern Ireland. The site consists of some 40,000 basalt columns rising out of the sea. The Giant's Causeway is Northern Ireland's only UNESCO World Heritage Site.

Understand

Myth

Popular mythology attributes the creation of the Causeway to an Irish giant named Fionn mac Cumhaill. To prove his superior strength and status, Fionn decided to fight against a rival Scottish giant named Benandonner. As there was no boat large enough to carry huge Finn across the sea to confront Bennandonner, he built his own pathway of stepping stones from Ireland to Scotland. He then was able to walk across the sea without getting his feet wet.

When he crossed the sea, however, he saw just how large Benandonner was. He ran back to Ireland before Bennandonner saw him, but the causeway was built and Bennandonner came to fight. Fionn crawled into a crib and when Bennandonner came to the door to fight him, his wife told him not to wake the baby. Seeing just how large Fionn's "baby" was, Bennandonner grew afraid and ran back to Scotland, tearing up the causeway as he went to prevent Fionn following him.

Scientific explanation

The true explanation while not as colorful as the myths of yore is still quite interesting. Scientists now agree that about 60 million years ago a volcano let basalt come to or close to the surface that slowly cooled forming the polygon-shapes as the hot material contracted due to cooling. The hexagonal shape is most common as it is the most "efficient" way to "pack" material (just as it is in a beehive). Later erosion formed the current structure, as the basaltic material forming the pillars is more resistant to erosion than other material. Similar structures (though in less impressive locations) can be found throughout the world.

See

The focal point of the area is, of course, the Giant's Causeway. There is no charge for visiting the causeway.

It is an interesting site to see but come prepared for a long and intense walk. Best to wear waterproof clothing and strong footwear. Giant's Causeway is split up into six sections; in walking order:

  • The Camel.
  • The Granny.
  • The Wishing Chair.
  • The Chimney Tops.
  • The Giant's Boot.
  • The Organ.

All six parts of the Giant's Causeway are different in shape and form and truly are a sight to be seen.

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Text(e) übernommen von:

Wikivoyage contributors, 'Giant's Causeway', Wikivoyage, The FREE worldwide travel guide that anyone can edit, 27 December 2018, 02:31 UTC, <https://en.wikivoyage.org/w/index.php?title=Giant%27s_Causeway&oldid=3678822> [accessed 15 January 2019]

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15.01.2019

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biroto-Redaktion

 

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