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Bristol to Landʹs End in Cornwall

No. of cycle route 3

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Elevation profile Bristol to Landʹs End in Cornwall

Added on 17 Jan 2012,

on 23 Feb 2017

Cycle route metrics

Total distance in km

518

Cumulative elevation gain in m

7.362

Avg. slope uphill in %

1,42

Cumulative elevation loss in m

7.309

GPS track data

Information about rights to the gps-track data

Rights owner

Openstreetmap and Contributors + biroto-Redaktion (biroto.eu)

Rights characteristic / license

by-sa: CREATIVE COMMONS Attribution-ShareAlike

Link to the description of the license

creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/

GPX file taken from

www.openstreetmap.org/browse/relation/72568

GPX file uploaded

by biroto-Redaktion on 17 Jan 2012

Track points in total

11.276

Track points per km (avg)

22

Start/endpoint

Start location

Bristol, England, GB (15 m NHN)

End location

Sennen Cove, England, GB (68 m NHN)

Signposting

The route is fully signed in both directions. 

Travel to and from ...

Books and maps:

  • Sustrans North Devon Cycle Map: Including the Tarka Trail Plus 4 Individual Day Rides (CycleCity Guides)
  • Sustrans Cornwall Cycle Map: Including the Camel Trail, Clay Trails and Mineral Tramways, Plus 4 Individual Day Rides (CycleCity Guides)
  • Sustrans Somerset Levels Cycle Map: Including the Strawberry Line, Bristol to Bath Railway Path, Colliers Way, Stop Line Way Plus 6 Individual Day Rides (CycleCity Guides)

Beds4Cyclists, worth visiting and infrastructure

Name and address

Latitude / Longitude

Phone
Fax
Mobile

Type of accommodation

Route km
Dist. to route
Elevation AMSL

Rating for cyclists

 

45 km
0,0 km
49 m

GB-BA5 Wells

 

Heritage building(s)

Wells Cathedral, West Front
Wells Cathedral, cloister
Wells, view along Vicarʹs Close with the Chapel and the Chapter House
Wells, Brickes Almshouses

Wells is the smallest city in England, with a population of around 10,000. It is in Somerset in the South West of the country. The city is dominated by the magnificent Gothic cathedral and is famous for its remarkably intact ecclesiastical quarter. This area contains the Bishop's Palace – the seat of the Bishop of Bath and Wells – and the Vicar's Close, a mediaeval street purported to be the oldest continuously-inhabited street in Europe. The city takes its name from the wells found in the Cathedral grounds.

See

  • Wells Cathedral (and its Grounds). Wells Cathedral is the only cathedral in England that still has a Vicars Close and Bishop's Palace intact (so they claim). This makes it a must-see and a will-see, as it rises above the town and is visible for miles! The most distinctive thing about this cathedral is the scissor arches in the transept. These modern-looking arches were built in the 1300s to stabilise the structure after a heightened tower was added, and they face north, south, and west. Wells Cathedral on Wikipedia 
  • Wells Museum (is opposite the cathedral). It portrays the history of the city. Wells and Mendip Museum on Wikipedia

Information about copyright

Rights characteristic / license

by-sa: CREATIVE COMMONS Attribution-ShareAlike

Link to the description of the license

creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/

Input taken over from:

Wikivoyage contributors, 'Wells', Wikivoyage, The FREE worldwide travel guide that anyone can edit, 15 April 2017, 19:38 UTC, <https://en.wikivoyage.org/w/index.php?title=Wells&oldid=3186118> [accessed 23 April 2017]

taken over / edited on

23 Apr 2017

taken over / edited by

biroto-Redaktion

 

46 km
0,1 km
43 m

 

GB-BA5 1SU Wells

 

Private/B&B

 

61 km
0,0 km
24 m

GB-BA6 8BT Glastonbury

 

Heritage building(s)

Glastonbury Tor with St Michaelʹs Tower
Glastonbury Abbey, ruines of the crossing and nave
Abbotʹs kitchen, Glastonbury Abbey
Glastonbury, Tithe Barn, home of the Somerset Rural Life Museum

Glastonbury is a small town (9,000 inhabitants) in the English West Country county of Somerset, some 20 miles (35 km) south of Bristol.

Understand

Glastonbury is best known for the myths and legends surrounding both Glastonbury Tor, a prominent hill rising up from the surrounding flat landscape; Glastonbury Abbey, which together have made the town a thriving centre for mystical, New Age, alternative spirituality; and the annual Glastonbury Festival, a summer music festival that has been likened to the equivalent of an ongoing Woodstock music festival.

See

  • Glastonbury Tor. Maintained by the National Trust. Glastonbury Tor on Wikipedia 
  • Glastonbury Abbey. Summer: 9am-6pm, Winter: 10am-4.30pm. A place of pilgrimage for thousands worldwide each year, one of the legendary burial places of King Arthur. Admission £5 adults, concessions available. Glastonbury Abbey on Wikipedia 
  • Glastonbury Tribunal, 9 High Street, BA6 9DP,  +44 1458 832954. to see museum, adults £2.50, children £1.00, concessions £2.00. The Tribunal, Glastonbury on Wikipedia 
  • The Chalice Well, Chilkwell Street,  +44 1458 831154. Known also as the Red Spring, The Chalice Well is a natural spring fresh water well sitting at the foot of Glastonbury Tor in the county of Somerset, England. The Chalice Well is owned and managed by the Chalice Well Trust. £4.65. Chalice Well on Wikipedia (updated Apr 2016)

Information about copyright

Rights characteristic / license

by-sa: CREATIVE COMMONS Attribution-ShareAlike

Link to the description of the license

creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/

Input taken over from:

Wikivoyage contributors, 'Glastonbury', Wikivoyage, The FREE worldwide travel guide that anyone can edit, 15 April 2017, 11:16 UTC, <https://en.wikivoyage.org/w/index.php?title=Glastonbury&oldid=3185883> [accessed 23 April 2017]

taken over / edited on

23 Apr 2017

taken over / edited by

biroto-Redaktion

 

61 km
0,5 km
31 m

 

GB-BA6 8BD Glastonbury

 

Private/B&B

 

115 km
2,6 km
67 m

GB-TA2 8LG Cheddon Fitzpaine

 

Manor

Hestercombe House and Garden
Hestercombe Gardens, Great Plat
Hestercombe Gardens
Hestercombe Gardens

Hestercombe House is a historic country house in the parish of West Monkton in the Quantock Hills, near Taunton in Somerset, England.

When the house and gardens were inherited by Coplestone Warre Bampfylde (1720–91) in the 18th century, a Georgian landscape garden was laid out, containing ponds, a grand cascade, a gothick alcove, a Tuscan temple arbour (1786), and a folly mausoleum. Bampfylde was an amateur architect of talent and a friend and adviser to Henry Hoare who laid out the gardens at Stourhead. Bampfylde also designed a Doric temple for the grounds, which was built around 1786, with an ashlar tetrastyle prostyle fronted by Tuscan columns and a large modillioned pediment. A Victorian formal parterre was added near the house by Henry Hall in the 1870s.

The Edwardian garden was laid out by Gertrude Jekyll and Edwin Lutyens between 1904 and 1906 for the Hon E.W.B. Portman, resulting in a garden "remarkable for the bold, concise pattern of its layout, and for the minute attention to detail everywhere to be seen in the variety and imaginative handling of contrasting materials, whether cobble, tile, flint, or thinly coursed local stone".

The "Great Plat" combined the patterned features of a parterre with the hardy herbaceous planting espoused by Miss Jekyll. Lutyens also designed the orangery about 50 m east of the main house between 1904–09, which is now Grade I listed, as are the garden walls, paving and steps on the south front of the house. On either side of the Great Plat are raised terraces with brick water channels. The eastern area is laid out as a Dutch garden laid out with perennial plants such as Large white flowering Yucca gloriosa as groups used vertical elements alternate with purple colored flowering dwarf Lavender (Lavandula), catmint (Nepeta) or silvery colored Zieste (Stachys), Cotton lavender (Santolina), China Rose (Rosa chinensis) or Fuchsia (Fuchsia magellanica).

Since October 2003, the landscape and gardens, extending to over 100 acres (0.40 km2), have been managed by the Hestercombe Gardens Trust, a registered charity set up to restore and preserve the site with a Heritage Lottery Fund grant of £3.7M. The Georgian landscape, Victorian shrubbery and terrace and the formal Edwardian gardens combine to create biodiversity and interest for visitors. The site is used by Lesser horseshoe bats (Rhinolophus hipposideros) as both a breeding and wintering roost site. Numbers of Lesser Horseshoes at this site are only exceeded by one other site in southwest England. The bats use roofspaces in a former stable block as a maternity site. It has been designated as a Special Area of Conservation (SAC).

Information about copyright

Rights characteristic / license

by-sa: CREATIVE COMMONS Attribution-ShareAlike

Link to the description of the license

creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/

Input taken over from:

Wikipedia contributors, 'Hestercombe House', Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia, 15 April 2017, 09:02 UTC, <https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Hestercombe_House&oldid=775502141> [accessed 23 April 2017]

taken over / edited on

23 Apr 2017

taken over / edited by

biroto-Redaktion

Hours of opening

10 am to 6pm – last entry at 5pm (4pm in Winter)

 

busy

 


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