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Cycle Route Chester - Salisbury

No. of cycle route 45

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Elevation profile Cycle Route Chester - Salisbury

Added on 15 Sep 2012,

on 15 Sep 2012

Cycle route metrics

Total distance in km

421

Cumulative elevation gain in m

4.248

Avg. slope uphill in %

1,01

Cumulative elevation loss in m

4.211

GPS track data

Information about rights to the gps-track data

Rights owner

Openstreetmap and Contributors + biroto-Redaktion (biroto.eu)

Rights characteristic / license

by-sa: CREATIVE COMMONS Attribution-ShareAlike

Link to the description of the license

creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/

GPX file taken from

www.openstreetmap.org/browse/relation/22602

GPX file uploaded

by biroto-Redaktion on 15 Sep 2012

Track points in total

6.560

Track points per km (avg)

16

Start/endpoint

Start location

Chester, England, GB (11 m NHN)

End location

Salisbury, England, GB (48 m NHN)

Beds4Cyclists, worth visiting and infrastructure

Name and address

Latitude / Longitude

Phone
Fax
Mobile

Type of accommodation

Route km
Dist. to route
Elevation AMSL

Rating for cyclists

 

2 km
0,3 km
38 m

GB-CH1 2ET Chester

 

Old town

Chester city centre
Chester, The Cross and The Rows
Chester Cathedral
The Eastgate, Chester

Chester (Welsh: Caer) is a very pretty and historic English city on the river Dee in the North-Western county of Cheshire. Although maybe not worth a whole holiday, it's well worth a day trip to see the Roman ruins. This fine city is also the gateway to North Wales, standing as it does directly on the border with the Principality. It is the nearest city of any size for a sizeble population in North Wales.

Understand

Chester originated in the Romano-British period at the latest, when it formed the settlement known as Deva or Castra Devana, the fortress city of the 20th Legion (Legio XX Valeria Victrix). As a result some parts of Chester are around two thousand years old. It was a Royalist stronghold during the English Civil War in the 1640s, and along the walls one can see the tower from which King Charles I watched his troops do battle.

A native of Chester is called a 'Cestrian'. Just as Cockneys must be born within earshot of the Bow Bells to be classed a 'true' Cockney, local tradition dictates that to be strictly deemed a 'Cestrian' the person must have been born within the boundaries of the city's Roman walls. However, the last maternity ward within those defined limits was relocated to its current site a couple of miles outside the city walls in the early 1970s.

See

  • Cathedral, 12 Abbey Square, +44 1244 324756. 9AM-5PM. Free, but a donation of £3 is suggested per adult. Chester Cathedral on Wikipedia 
  • Grosvenor Park. The main ornamental park in Chester and includes a pond, miniature railway, open air theatre and children's play area. Grosvenor Park, Chester on Wikipedia 
  • The Eastgate Clock. It is claimed to be the second most photographed clock in the UK. Gatehouse from 1768-9 and clock dating from 1899. Eastgate and Eastgate Clock on Wikipedia (updated Sep 2016)
Roman Chester

Chester (or "Deva" in Latin) was one of the great military bases in Roman England, and as such, has its fair share of Roman ruins. Historians have even speculated that had the Roman departure not happened, Chester would have become the Roman Capital of England.

  • Walls. The city centre is enclosed by the walls, which offer a pleasant strolling route for visitors and locals alike. Walk around the top of Roman walls that surround the city. 
  • Amphitheatre, Vicars Lane, Chester (Adjacent to the Grosvenor Park). Believed to have been the site of the largest wooden structure amphitheatre in the Roman Empire outside of Rome for its time, with a larger stone amphitheatre later built on-top of the foundations Chester Roman Amphitheatre on Wikipedia 
  • Roman Gardens. With reconstructed hypocaust. 
  • Spud u Like, Bridge Street. The basement of this shop gives access to an original hypocaust. 

Information about copyright

Rights characteristic / license

by-sa: CREATIVE COMMONS Attribution-ShareAlike

Link to the description of the license

creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/

Input taken over from:

Wikivoyage contributors, 'Chester', Wikivoyage, The FREE worldwide travel guide that anyone can edit, 16 December 2019, 13:22 UTC, https://en.wikivoyage.org/w/index.php?title=Chester&oldid=3897289 [accessed 26 December 2019]

taken over / edited on

26 Dec 2019

taken over / edited by

biroto-Redaktion

 

120 km
1,8 km
50 m

GB-TF8 7BP Buildwas

 

Abbey/convent

Buildwas Abbey, remains of the church
Buildwas Abbey, remains of the church
Buildwas Abbey, remains of the Chapter House

Buildwas Abbey is located along the banks of the River Severn in Buildwas, Shropshire, England, about two miles west of Ironbridge.

The Cistercian Abbey of St Mary and St Chad was founded in 1135 by Roger de Clinton, Bishop of Coventry (1129–1148) as a Savignac monastery and was inhabited by a small community of monks from Furness Abbey. The stone from which it was built was quarried in the nearby settlement of Broseley.

The abbey's location near the border of Wales meant it was destined to have a turbulent history. Welsh Princes and their followers regularly raided the Abbey and on one occasion in 1406, during the rebellion of Owain Glyndwr, raiders from Powys even kidnapped the abbot. This however paled in comparison to an earlier event in 1342 where one of the Buildwas monks, Thomas Tong, murdered his abbot, managed to evade arrest, and then petitioned for re-instatement into the Cistercian order.

The abbey was closed in 1536 by the order of Henry VIII during the Dissolution of the Monasteries, whereupon the estate was granted to Edward Grey, 3rd Baron Grey of Powis.

The abbot's house and infirmary were later incorporated into the building of a private house in the 17th century for the Acton Moseley family, although the remaining buildings are now in the care of English Heritage. They are open to the public, who can view the church which remains largely complete and unaltered since its original construction, although it is now without its roof.

The remains are considered to be among some of the best preserved twelfth-century examples of a Cistercian church in Britain.

Information about copyright

Rights characteristic / license

by-sa: CREATIVE COMMONS Attribution-ShareAlike

Link to the description of the license

creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/

Input taken over from:

Wikipedia contributors, 'Buildwas Abbey', Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia, 17 January 2017, 02:34 UTC, <https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Buildwas_Abbey&oldid=760455191> [accessed 23 April 2017]

taken over / edited on

23 Apr 2017

taken over / edited by

biroto-Redaktion

Hours of opening

Wednesday to Sunday 10:00 - 17:00

 
 

123 km
0,0 km
37 m

GB-TF8 Ironbridge

 

Industrial heritage/World heritage site

The Iron Bridge at Ironbridge
The Iron Bridge at Ironbridge
The Iron Bridge at Ironbridge

The Iron Bridge is a bridge that crosses the River Severn in Shropshire, England. Opened in 1781, it was the first major bridge in the world to be made of cast iron, and was greatly celebrated after construction owing to its use of the new material.

In 1934 it was designated a Scheduled Ancient Monument and closed to vehicular traffic. Tolls for pedestrians were collected until 1950, when ownership of the bridge was transferred to Shropshire County Council. It now belongs to Telford and Wrekin Borough Council. The bridge, the adjacent settlement of Ironbridge and the Ironbridge Gorge form the UNESCO Ironbridge Gorge World Heritage Site. The bridge is a Grade I listed building, and a waypoint on the South Telford Heritage Trail.

Abraham Darby I first smelted local iron ore with coke made from Coalbrookdale coal in 1709, and in the coming decades Shropshire became a centre for industry due to the low price of fuel from local mines. The River Severn was used as a key trading route, but it was also a barrier to travel around the deep Severn Gorge, especially between the then important industrial parishes of Broseley and Madeley, the nearest bridge being at Buildwas two miles away. The use of the river by boat traffic and the steep sides of the gorge meant that any bridge should ideally be of a single span, and sufficiently high to allow tall ships to pass underneath. The steepness and instability of the banks was problematic for building a bridge, and there was no point where roads on opposite sides of the river converged.

Information about copyright

Rights characteristic / license

by-sa: CREATIVE COMMONS Attribution-ShareAlike

Link to the description of the license

creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/

Input taken over from:

Wikipedia contributors, 'The Iron Bridge', Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia, 11 April 2017, 01:57 UTC, <https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=The_Iron_Bridge&oldid=774852628> [accessed 23 April 2017]

taken over / edited on

23 Apr 2017

taken over / edited by

biroto-Redaktion

 

210 km
0,4 km
27 m

 

GB-WR1 2QL Worcester

 

Tourist information

Hours of opening

Monday – Friday 9.30am – 5.00pm Saturday & Bank Holidays 10.00am – 4.00pm.

Languages spoken:

English


 

236 km
2,5 km
17 m

GB-GL20 Tewkesbury

 

Church/cathedral

Tewkesbury Abbey
Tewkesbury Abbey
Tewkesbury Abbey
The Gatehouse, Tewkesbury Abbey

The Abbey Church of St Mary the Virgin, Tewkesbury, (commonly known as Tewkesbury Abbey), in the English county of Gloucestershire, is the second largest parish church in the country and a former Benedictine monastery. It is one of the finest examples of Norman architecture in Britain, and has probably the largest Romanesque crossing tower in Europe.

Tewkesbury had been a centre for worship since the 7th century, becoming a priory in the 10th. The present building was started in the early 12th century. It was unsuccessfully used as a sanctuary in the Wars of the Roses. After the Dissolution of the Monasteries it became the parish church for the town. George Gilbert Scott lead Restoration in the late 19th century. The church and churchyard within the abbey precincts includes tombs and memorials to many of the aristocracy of the area.

Services have been high church but now include Parish Eucharist, choral Mass and Evensong. These are accompanied by one of the church's three organs and choirs. There is a ring of twelve bells, hung for change ringing.

The church itself is one of the finest Norman buildings in England. Its massive crossing tower was said, by Sir Nikolaus Pevsner, to be "probably the largest and finest Romanesque tower in England". Fourteen of England's cathedrals are of smaller dimensions, while only Westminster Abbey contains more medieval church monuments.

Information about copyright

Rights characteristic / license

by-sa: CREATIVE COMMONS Attribution-ShareAlike

Link to the description of the license

creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/

Input taken over from:

Wikipedia contributors, 'Tewkesbury Abbey', Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia, 16 January 2017, 13:14 UTC, <https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Tewkesbury_Abbey&oldid=760353373> [accessed 23 April 2017]

taken over / edited on

23 Apr 2017

taken over / edited by

biroto-Redaktion

Hours of opening

Sunday from 7.30am until 6pm year round.

Monday to Saturday 8.30am until 5.30pm. Except Wednesdays and Fridays when we open at 7.30am.

 

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