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Cycle Route Sunderland - Inverness

No. of cycle route 7

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Elevation profile Cycle Route Sunderland - Inverness

Added on 30 May 2012,

on 30 May 2012

Cycle route metrics

Total distance in km

872

Cumulative elevation gain in m

10.980

Avg. slope uphill in %

1,26

Cumulative elevation loss in m

10.974

GPS track data

Information about rights to the gps-track data

Rights owner

Openstreetmap and Contributors + biroto-Redaktion (biroto.eu)

Rights characteristic / license

by-sa: CREATIVE COMMONS Attribution-ShareAlike

Link to the description of the license

creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/

GPX file taken from

www.openstreetmap.org/browse/relation/11017

GPX file uploaded

by biroto-Redaktion on 30 May 2012

Track points in total

13.077

Track points per km (avg)

15

Start/endpoint

Start location

Sunderland, England, GB (2 m NHN)

End location

North Kessock, Schottland, GB (8 m NHN)

Beds4Cyclists, worth visiting and infrastructure

Name and address

Latitude / Longitude

Phone
Fax
Mobile

Type of accommodation

Route km
Dist. to route
Elevation AMSL

Rating for cyclists

 

96 km
2,9 km
278 m

 

GB-CA9 3JB Alston

 

Tourist information

 

126 km
1,8 km
107 m

GB-CA10 Penrith

 

Castle/palace

River Eamont at Brougham Castle
Brougham Castle
Brougham Castle

Hours of opening

April - Sept.: 10:00 - 18:00
Oct.: 10:00 - 16:00

 

128 km
3,5 km
142 m

GB-CA10 Clifton

 

Manor

Clifton Hall
Clifton Hall

Clifton Hall was a fortified manor house in the Clifton, Cumbria, England. Dating from around 1400, it was constructed by either Elianor Engaine or her son-in-law William Wybergh, and was held by the Wybergh family until the 19th century. Initially taking the form of an "H"-plan design built around a central hall, around 1500 a three-story stone pele tower was added, providing both additional security and acting as a status symbol for the family. At the start of the 17th century a new stone hall was added to the south of the tower.

The Wyberghs were able to retain Clifton Hall, despite the challenges of the English Civil War, but the house was caught up in the Jacobite risings of 1715 and 1745. In the early 19th century most of Clifton Hall was pulled down to make way for a new farmhouse, and only the pele tower survived. In the 21st century the tower is in the care of English Heritage and operates as a tourist attraction.

Information about copyright

Rights characteristic / license

by-sa: CREATIVE COMMONS Attribution-ShareAlike

Link to the description of the license

creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/

Input taken over from:

Wikipedia contributors, 'Clifton Hall, Cumbria', Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia, 24 January 2017, 20:12 UTC, <https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Clifton_Hall,_Cumbria&oldid=761786084> [accessed 8 May 2017]

taken over / edited on

08 May 2017

taken over / edited by

biroto-Redaktion

Hours of opening

Open any reasonable time during daylight hours

 

128 km
0,2 km
136 m

GB-CA11 7NE Eden

 

Bike Lockers

 

168 km
0,2 km
24 m

GB-CA3 8TZ Carlisle

 

Church/cathedral

The stained glass and tracery of Carlisle Cathedral
Inside the choir of Carlisle Cathedral
Ceiling in Carlisle Cathedral
Carlisle Cathedral

The Cathedral Church of the Holy and Undivided Trinity, otherwise called Carlisle Cathedral, is the seat of the Anglican Bishop of Carlisle. It is located in Carlisle, in Cumbria, North West England. It was founded as an Augustinian priory and became a cathedral in 1133.

Carlisle, because of heavy losses to its fabric, is the second smallest (after Oxford), of England's ancient cathedrals. Its notable features include some fine figurative stone carving, a set of medieval choir stalls and the largest window in the Flowing Decorated Gothic style in England.

Information about copyright

Rights characteristic / license

by-sa: CREATIVE COMMONS Attribution-ShareAlike

Link to the description of the license

creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/

Input taken over from:

Wikipedia contributors, 'Carlisle Cathedral', Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia, 20 March 2017, 16:40 UTC, <https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Carlisle_Cathedral&oldid=771276912> [accessed 8 May 2017]

taken over / edited on

08 May 2017

taken over / edited by

biroto-Redaktion

Hours of opening

The Cathedral is usually open daily from 7.30am to 6.15pm Monday to Saturday, and 7.30am to 5.00pm on Sunday.

For service times please see the section on Daily Services or the Cathedral diary.

Please note that the Cathedral is regularly used for a variety of public and private events which may not be highlighted in the website diary. 

 

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