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Radtour von Mailand nach Friedrichshafen

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Höhen-Profil Radtour von Mailand nach Friedrichshafen

Erstellt am 25.03.2018,

am 25.03.2018

Strecken-Merkmale

geplant

gefahren

Gesamtlänge in km

1.135

0

Gesamthöhenmeter Aufstieg

6.047

0

Durchschn. Steigung Aufstieg %

0,53

-

Gesamthöhenmeter Abstieg

5.813

0

GPS-Track-Daten

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Gesamtzahl Trackpoints

5.148

0

Trackpoint-Dichte per km

5

0

Endorte

Start

Milan, Lombardy, IT (186 m NHN)

Ziel

Friedrichshafen, Baden-Württemberg, DE (420 m NHN)

Charakter

Die Tour kombiniert den Po Radweg von Mailand bis Ostiglia. Dann zweigt sie in den Via Claudia Augusta Radweg ab bis Füssen. Dort führt sie durchs Allgäu bis nach Friedrichshafen.

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Landschaft

Dem Po entlang komplett flach und trocken. Ab Verona fängt es langsam an Hügelig zu werden um dann im Allgäu nur noch auf un ab zu gehen. 

Grundsätzlich sollte die Tour umgekehrt gefahren werden, doch als ich gestartet bin hat es im Allgäu geregnet so dass ich kurzerhand die Tour gedreht habe. Hat sich gelohnt, hatte keinen Tropfen Regen abbekommen.

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An- und Abreise

Mit dem Zug von Zürich nach Mailand. Direktverbindung, Fahrradtransport kein Problem.

Bemerkungen

Die Tour bin ich im September 2016 gefahren

Etappen

Fahrradfreundliche Unterkünfte, Sehenswertes und Infrastruktur

Name u. Anschrift

Breite / Länge

Tel.
Fax.
Mobile

Art d. Unterkunft

Strecken-km
km zur Strecke
Höhe über NHN

Radlerfreundlichkeit

 

4 km
0,9 km
134 m

IT-20122 Milano

 

Historische(s) Gebäude

Milan Cathedral from Piazza del Duomo
Castello Sforzesco, Milan

The Centro Storico is the historic centre of the city of Milan, contained within the area once delimited by the medieval city walls and today by the streets forming the Corso Navigli easily distinguishable on the map of the city. Centro Storico encompasses Milan's perhaps most famous landmarks and tourist attractions, including the Duomo (cathedral), Galleria Vittorio Emmanuelle shopping arcade and the Teatro alla Scala opera house. Compact in size and easily walkable, the Centro Storico is just as full of historic monuments as it is of designer boutiques and showrooms, restaurants and caffes - you will find almost all one comes to find in Milan for within not more than a quarter's walk.

The defunct old Milan district of "Centro Storico" included a broader area; the area covered in this guide corresponds to the Quartiere 101 - Duomo of the present-day Zona 1.

See

Churches
  • Duomo (Cathedral), Duomo Square (metro lines MM1 or MM3 Duomo Station; or with many buses and trams). Cathedral: 08:00-19:00 (Aug 2016). Roof terraces: 09:00-19:00 (box office closes 1 hr earlier). The Milan's cathedral is a massive late Gothic church (started in 1386) in white marble, with hundreds of spires and thousands of statues on its exterior and a famous façade. Don't miss the chance to climb up onto the roof and enjoy the spectacular views of the city between the Gothic spires. Taking pictures inside the cathedral is supposedly prohibited; however, the attendants rarely stop anyone doing so. Unless you are physically unfit, it is best recommended to take the stairs (250 steps only) and save €4. On an average it should not take more than 5–6 minutes to climb the stairs. Before lining up to climb up the stairs buy your tickets in advance at the ticket office. Does also include a museum displaying the 700-year-old history of construction of the cathedral, with impressive walk-in wooden models, façade designs originating from several centuries, sculptures and more.
    Warning: at the moment (March 2018) visiting inside the Duomo cannot be recommended. This is because to actually get in you have to go through a painfully slow and annoying security check, performed by Italian army officers who are usually overzealous and unfriendly. You'll usually have to queue for about 60-90 min. to reach the checkpoint; there your person and your belongings will be mercilessly searched, and if any forbidden item is found it will be taken and thrown away. You may feel you're being treated like an offender. Moreover, the list of restrictions and regulations you have to obey is impressive: check it at the ticket office. If you still want to go, allow 1-2 hours to buy your ticket and reach the entrance, and 10-20 minutes to see the interior. The nearby Duomo museum is a better choice: same €3 ticket, no queuing, no fuss, no security nonsense. Cathedral:€ 3. Roof terraces: on foot - €9, by lift - €13; Museum: €3 (same ticket as the cathedral); Archeological area: €7. Milan Cathedral on Wikipedia (updated Mar 2018)
  • San Maurizio al Monastero Maggiore (Saint Maurice), Corso Magenta, 15, +390220404175. A must-see! A stunning fully frescoed renaissance church. Most of the paintings are the work of Bernardino Luini. Free. San Maurizio al Monastero Maggiore on Wikipedia
  • Basilica di Sant'Ambrogio (Saint Ambrose), Piazza San Ambrogio (subway MM2 Sant'Ambrogio). A beautiful and huge Romanesque church which was almost destroyed by allied bombing in World War II, although some of its mosaics left well preserved. Basilica of Sant'Ambrogio on Wikipedia
  • Basilica di San Lorenzo Maggiore (Saint Lawrence) (tram, or the Missori Metro Station). A lovely 4th-century basilica, perhaps is one of the oldest basilicas in Western Europe. It is famous for its beautiful courtyard, with Roman-age columns and statue of the emperor Constantine. The columns, Colonne di San Lorenzo (St. Lawrence's colonnade), are actually a remain of the Roman "Mediolanum", dating from the 3rd century AD. Further south the square you can see Medieval Porta Ticinese (there is also a homonymous newer gate which lies about 600 m south by Corso di Porta Ticinese). Basilica of San Lorenzo, Milan on Wikipedia
Museums
  • Ambrosian Library (Biblioteca Ambrosiana), Piazza Pio XI, 2, fax: +39 02 80692 210. Historical library that also houses the Ambrosian art gallery with treasures such as Leonardo Atlantic Codex. Biblioteca Ambrosiana on Wikipedia
  • Civic Archeological Museum (Civico Museo Archeologico), Corso Magenta 15. Roman antiques from Milan and the surrounding area. Archaeological Museum (Milan) on Wikipedia
  • Brera Art Gallery (Pinacoteca di Brera), Via Brera (subway MM2 Lanza-Piccolo Teatro Station, MM3 Montenapoleone Station, trams lines 1, 4, 8, 12, 14, 27 or buses 61 and 97). One of Italy's most important art collections and one of the foremost collections of Italian paintings. Pinacoteca di Brera on Wikipedia
  • Scala Theater Museum (Museo Teatrale alla Scala), inside the La Scala (Metro MM1 or MM3 Duomo Station), +39 02 88797473. 09:00-17:30; Dec 07,Dec 25,Dec 26,Jan 01 off. A museum dedicated to one of the world's most famous opera houses. All types of memorabilias like dresses and pictures are on display. A glance into the opera hall is also possible. €9 (€6 for students and people older than 65). Museo Teatrale alla Scala on Wikipedia
  • Royal Palace (Palazzo Reale) (opposite the South side of Duomo; Subway: MM1 and MM3 Duomo Station). Always hosts many exhibitions, usually very interesting. Royal Palace of Milan on Wikipedia
  • Bagatti Valsecchi Museum (Museo Bagatti Valsecchi), Via Gesù 5 (between via della Spiga and via Montenapoleone; subway MM3 Montenapoleone Station, MM1 San Babila Station, trams lines 1 and 2 Montenapoleone stop). Tu W F-Su 13:00-17:45pm, Th 13:00-21:00. A late 19th century aristocratic mansion with Italian Renaissance art collections. €9. Bagatti Valsecchi Museum on Wikipedia
  • Poldi Pezzoli Museum (Museo Poldi Pezzoli), Manzoni St (subway MM3 Montenapoleone Station, or with many buses and trams). M W-Su 10:00-18:00 (last entrance at 17:30). One of the world's richest private art collections. €10. Museo Poldi Pezzoli on Wikipedia
Streets
  • Via Dante. One of the grandest and most frequented fashionable high streets in Milan. The Via Dante, named after the poet, is a beautiful and debonair pedestrian avenue which goes from the busy Piazzale Cordusio, all the way to the Largo Cairoli, just in front of the city castle. With loads of street vendors, restaurant and cafe tables, and often, street art, glamorous boutiques and often bustling with people, it's great for anyone who wants to get to the Sforzesco Castle, but who also wants to do some high-class shopping, observe at some glorious Milanese palaces, and possibly sip at a coffee in one of the many open-air bars. It also contains the Piccolo Teatro, a renowned local theatre. At times, especially Christmas and some of the holidays, it can be chokingly filled with locals, shoppers and tourists. Via Dante on Wikipedia
  • Corso Vittorio Emanuele II (near to the Duomo; Duomo metro station or that of San Babila). One of the most popular high street shopping arteries in the city. It has a very elegant modern appearance, but too has some well-preserved grand 18th- and 19th-century buildings, including a rotunda-like neoclassical church. The Corso contains some great retail stores, including big shopping centres, fashionable outlets, and youthful, sporty designer boutiques. It is pedestrian. it:Corso Vittorio Emanuele II (Milano) on Wikipedia
  • Via Manzoni (Montenapoleone metro station or tram). Impressive refined-air street lined with aristocratic apartment blocks and opulent churches. It also hosts the Poldi Pezzoldi museum. Today, it is also one of the city's premier shopping streets, and is noted for containing the Armani Megastore. It is very close to La Scala opera house. Via Manzoni on Wikipedia
  • Via della Spiga (short walk from the MM1 San Babila metro stop). Lovely and classy little cobblestone street, with some beautiful ancient buildings. The street and its neighborhood are more famous for the center of high-class shopping, where almost every luxury brand can be found. Via della Spiga on Wikipedia
  • Via Montenapoleone (Montenapoleone or San Babila metro stations). The city's top high fashion shopping street. It contains many of the biggest names in fashion, and some of the trendiest and famous emporia and designer stores in the world. Today, despite containing mainly fashion boutiques, there are also a some jewellery shops and cafes scattered here and there. Via Monte Napoleone on Wikipedia
Squares
  • Piazza del Duomo (Duomo metro station). The grandest square in the city, the Piazza del Duomo is the cultural and social heart of Milan, and contains several of its most famous sights. Of course, the majestic cathedral and classy Galleria are there, but there also is the Palazzo Reale (Royal Palace), a fine 18th-century building which is currently an art exhibition centre, and several big, austere, old buildings. The street, with its huge lights, enormous statue of King Victor, huge buildings, and dark floor does at first sight seem quite overwhelming and overly majestic, but with its lovely cafes, top-quality restaurants and shops, constant flow of pigeons, and the presence of people make it an extremely appealing and interesting place. Since lots of the main streets and sights are or are routed from this place, you can't really miss it. Piazza del Duomo, Milan on Wikipedia
  • Piazza dei Mercanti (Duomo or Cordusio subway stations). A truly enchanting and tiny medieval square, hidden by the grand palaces in the central part of Milan. Here, in "Merchants' Square" you get lovely Gothic and Renaissance-porticoed houses, and a well right in the middle. At the one side of the square there is the Palazzo della Ragione (1233), the old town hall, aka Broletto Nuovo. At the other -- Loggia degli Osii (1321) decorated with black and white marble, formerly hosted judicial and notary offices. At Christmas time, the square fills up with markets selling local produce, including mouth-watering panettone, sweets, bonbons and souvenirs. Piazza Mercanti on Wikipedia
  • Piazzale Cordusio (To be reached via Cordusio station, or, the slightly further Duomo). A central and busy square in Milan, right near the Duomo. It boasts some grand and beautiful late-19th-century architecture. Once, and to some extent still today, it was an economic hub of the city, with the headquarters of several companies, and big banks and postal offices. Piazza Cordusio on Wikipedia
  • Piazza Belgiojoso (Montenapoleone station). A small, yet very impressive square, which hosts the magnificent neoclassical Belgiojoso Palace, built by Milanese noblemen in the late 1700s, and the House of Manzoni, where notable Italian writer and literary figure Alessandro Manzoni lived, and which today hosts a library and the Centro Nazionale di Studi Manzoniani (National Centre of Manzoni-related studies). Palazzo Belgioioso on Wikipedia
  • Piazza Della Scala. The location of the Statue of Leonardo da Vinci and La Scala theatre. It is a small, but grand square flanked by fine palaces, such as the city hall and the commercial bank. Great place for a photograph and right next to Galleria Vittorio Emanuele. Ticket office is underground in the Duomo Metropolitana stop. Piazza della Scala on Wikipedia
  • Piazza San Babila (It can be reached via the Via Montenapoleone, the Corso Vittorio Emanuele or the Corso di Porta Venezia. To visit it, one may stop at the San Babila metro station, right in the middle of the piazza). Busy and modern square just north of the cathedral and near the city's fashion district. Architecturally, Piazza San Babila's buildings are virtually all Art-Deco office blocks from the 1930s, but it has a trendy business and cosmopolitan feel to it, and despite being very modern, boasts a very old sight, San Babila, a tiny, pretty, Romanesque church standing shadowed away by the huge modern skyscrapers. Piazza San Babila also contains numerous banks, post offices, fast-food restaurants and today also a touch of some funky designer stores too. Convenience wise, it's a great place to go, because it connects the Montenapoleone shopping area, with the more central Duomo zone. Piazza San Babila on Wikipedia
  • Piazza del Liberty (The closest station is Duomo, but San Babila is a decent distance too). Small square, which however, is noted for a stunning Art Nouveau palace today called the Hotel del Corso, but once the Trianon. You reach it just off a tiny opening at the beginning of the Corso Vittorio Emanuele.
  • Piazzale Cadorna (Cadorna Square) (Cadorna FN station). Medium-sized, normal square in central Milan with the funky modern North Station and some fine buildings, but notably a set of peculiar modern sculptures in the middle. Piazzale Cadorna on Wikipedia
Historic monuments
  • Castello Sforzesco (Reachable by subway: MM1 Cairoli - castello Station). A large medieval castle with a grass-covered courtyard, where the Sforza-Visconti ruling families of Milan resided. Later it was the Austrian governor's residence, when Lombardy was part of the Hapsburg empire. It houses several museums, including museums of applied arts, ancient art, historical musical instruments, prehistory, Egyptian art and fine arts. Sforza Castle on Wikipedia
  • Old Hospital (Ospedale Maggiore). A Renaissance complex which now serves the university. it:Ca' Granda on Wikipedia
Other sights
  • Biblioteca Nazionale Braidense (Biblioteca di Brera). — A library established in 1770 by the Austrian governor. It has since acquired other historical collections and the archives of RAI (Italy's state television). It is very active in organising workshops and debates on new media and new technologies. Biblioteca di Brera on Wikipedia
  • Torre Velasca (Closest metro stations in order are Missori and Crocetta.). A tall, huge, castle-like skyscraper built in the 1950s, and one of the first in Italy. Stunning modern architecture. Unfortunately it is not possible to go on top, since it is a private building. Torre Velasca on Wikipedia
  • Expo Gate, Via Luca Beltrami (between Castello Sforzesco and the beginning of Via Dante). Daily 10:00-20:00. Information hub and ticket office for the Expo Milano 2015. The gate consists of two structures designed by Scandurra Studio. 
  • L.O.V.E. sculpture (Il Dito), Piazza degli Affari. On the square, where the Italian Stock exchange has its headquarters. The abbreviation L.O.V.E. stands for Libertà, Odio, Vendetta, Eternità (Freedom, Hate, Vengeance, Eternity). it:L.O.V.E. on Wikipedia  (updated Jan 2018)

Do

  • See Milan from above. take the stairs or the elevator up to the roof of Duomo. It is a great experience for a stunning, panoramic view of the city between the spires and statues of the cathedral. (updated Aug 2017)

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Wikivoyage contributors, 'Milan/Centro Storico', Wikivoyage, The FREE worldwide travel guide that anyone can edit, 20 March 2018, 14:52 UTC, <https://en.wikivoyage.org/w/index.php?title=Milan/Centro_Storico&oldid=3449102> [accessed 26 March 2018]

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4 km
0,7 km
135 m

 

IT-20121 Milano

 

Touristen Information

Öffnungszeiten

Monday to Friday:  9:00 - 19:00
Saturday: 9:00 - 18:00
Sunday and holidays: 10:00 - 18:00
Closed on December 25th, January 1st

 

42 km
0,3 km
108 m

 

IT-20081 Morimondo

 

Privat/B&B

 

79 km
0,1 km
50 m

IT-27100 Pavia

 

Technisches Denkmal

Pavia, Ponte coperto sul fiume Ticino
Ponte coperto fi Pavia, lato est

The Ponte Coperto "covered bridge" (also known as the Ponte Vecchio "Old Bridge") is a brick and stone arch bridge over the Ticino River in Pavia.

The previous bridge, dating from 1354 (itself a replacement for a Roman construction), was heavily damaged by Allied action in 1945. A debate on whether to fix or replace the bridge ended when the bridge partially collapsed in 1947, requiring new construction, which began in 1949. The new bridge is based on the previous one, which had seven arches to the current bridge's five.

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Wikipedia contributors, 'Ponte Coperto', Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia, 26 April 2013, 19:30 UTC, <http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Ponte_Coperto&oldid=552319354> [accessed 4 March 2014]

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80 km
0,2 km
81 m

IT-27100 Pavia

 

Historisches Ortsbild

Pavia, Ponte Coperto e cupola del Duomo
Pavia, San Michele Maggiore
Pavia, Torri medioevali
Palazzo Mezzabarba, sede del municipio

Pavia (Italian: [paˈviːa] ; Lombard Pavia; Latin: Ticinum; Medieval Latin Papia) is a town and comune of south-western Lombardy, 35 kilometres (22 miles) south of Milan on the lower Ticino river near its confluence with the Po. It is the capital of the province of Pavia. It has a population of c. 71,000.

Pavia is the capital of a fertile eponymous province known for agricultural products including wine, rice, cereals, and dairy products. Although there are a number of industries located in the suburbs, these tend not to disturb the peaceful atmosphere of the town. The town also is home to the ancient University of Pavia. The city was also the capital of the Kingdom of the Lombards from 568 to 774. The city possesses a vast amount of artistic and cultural treasures, including several important churches and museums, such as the well-known Certosa di Pavia.

See

Pavia's most famous landmark is the Certosa, or Carthusian monastery, founded in 1396 and located eight kilometres (5.0 miles) north of the city.

Among other notable structures are:

  • Cathedral of Pavia (Duomo di Pavia), begun in 1488; however, only by 1898 were the façade and the dome completed according to the original design. The central dome has an octagonal plan, stands 97 m high, and weighs some 20,000 tons. This dome is the third for size in Italy, after St. Peter's Basilica and Santa Maria del Fiore in Florence. Next to the Duomo were the Civic Tower (existing at least from 1330 and enlarged in 1583 by Pellegrino Tibaldi): its fall on March 17, 1989.
  • San Michele Maggiore (St. Michael) is an outstanding example of Lombard-Romanesque church architecture in Lombardy. It is located on the site of a pre-existing Lombard church, which the lower part of the campanile belongs to. Destroyed in 1004, the church was rebuilt from around the end of the 11th century (including the crypt, the transept and the choir), and finished in 1155. It is characterized by an extensive use of sandstone and by a very long transept, provided with a façade and an apse of its own. In the church the Emperor Frederick Barbarossa was crowned in 1155.
  • The Basilica of San Pietro in Ciel d'Oro ("St. Peter in Golden Sky"), where Saint Augustine, Boethius and the Lombard king Liutprand are buried, was begun in the 6th century. The current construction was built in 1132. It is similar to San Michele Maggiore, but different in the asymmetric façade with a single portal, the use of brickwork instead of sandstone, and, in the interior, the absence of matronei, galleries reserved for women and the shortest transept. The noteworthy arch housing the relics of St. Augustine was built in 1362 by artists from Campione, and is decorated by some 150 statues and reliefs. The church is mentioned by Dante Alighieri in the X canto of his Divine Comedy.
  • San Francesco d'Assisi, a late Romanesque church (1238–98) with a restored Gothic façade, located on Corso Cairoli.
  • San Teodoro (1117), dedicated to Theodore of Pavia, a medieval bishop of the Diocese of Pavia, is the third romanesque basilica in the city, though smaller than the former ones. It is situated on the slopes leading down to the Ticino river and served the fishermen. The apses and the three-level tiburium are samples of the effective simplicity of romanesque decoration. Inside are two outstanding bird's-eye-view frescoes of the city (1525) attributed to the painter Bernardino Lanzani. The latter, the definitive release, was stripped off disclosing the unfinished first one. Both are impressively detailed and reveal how little Pavia’s urban design has changed during the last 500 years.
  • The large fortified Castello Visconteo (built 1360-1365 by Galeazzo II Visconti). In spite of its being fortified, it actually was used as a private residence rather than a stronghold. The poet Francesco Petrarca spent some time there, when Gian Galeazzo Visconti called him to take charge of the magnificent library which owned about a thousand books and manuscripts, subsequently lost. The Castle is now home to the City Museums (Musei Civici) and the park is a popular attraction for children. An unconfirmed legend wants the Castle to be connected by a secret underground tunnel to the Certosa.
  • The church of Santa Maria del Carmine is one of the best known examples of Gothic brickwork architecture in northern Italy. It is the second largest church in the city after the cathedral and is built on the Latin cross plan, with a perimeter of 80 x 40 meters comprising a nave and two aisles. The characteristic façade has a large rose window and seven cusps.
  • The renaissance church of Santa Maria di Canepanova is attributed to Bramante.
  • The medieval towers still shape the town skyline. The main clusters still rising are rallied in Piazza Leonardo da Vinci, Via Luigi Porta, and Piazza Collegio Borromeo.

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Text(e) übernommen von:

Wikipedia contributors, 'Pavia', Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia, 15 February 2014, 23:29 UTC, <http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Pavia&oldid=595653966> [accessed 4 March 2014]

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