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Camino del Cid Cycle Route

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Elevation profile Camino del Cid Cycle Route

Added on 01 Aug 2017,

on 02 Aug 2017

Cycle route metrics

Total distance in km

1.359

Cumulative elevation gain in m

21.268

Avg. slope uphill in %

1,56

Cumulative elevation loss in m

22.093

GPS track data

Information about rights to the gps-track data

Rights owner

Openstreetmap and Contributors + biroto-Redaktion (biroto.eu)

Rights characteristic / license

Contains information from OpenStreetMap, which is made available here under the Open Database License(ODbL)

Link to the description of the license

opendatacommons.org/licenses/odbl/

GPX file taken from

https://www.openstreetmap.org/relation/2188235

GPX file uploaded

by biroto-Redaktion on 02 Aug 2017

Track points in total

24.879

Track points per km (avg)

18

Start/endpoint

Start location

Quintanilla Vivar, Castile and León, ES (855 m NHN)

End location

Orihuela, Valencian Community, ES (30 m NHN)

Sources of information

Web-Sites:

Beds4Cyclists, worth visiting and infrastructure

Name and address

Latitude / Longitude

Phone
Fax
Mobile

Type of accommodation

Route km
Dist. to route
Elevation AMSL

Rating for cyclists

 

12 km
1,5 km
843 m

ES-09001 Burgos

 

Bike Lockers

16 bike lockers available.

 

13 km
0,9 km
845 m

Monasterio de las Huelgas Reales de Burgos
Claustro de San Fernando en el Monasterio de Santa María la Real de las Huelgas
Monasterio de Santa María la Real de Las Huelgas

The Abbey of Santa María la Real de Las Huelgas is a monastery of Cistercian nuns located approximately 1.5 km west of the city of Burgos. The word huelgas, which usually refers to "labor strikes" in modern Spanish, refers in this case to land which had been left fallow. Historically, the monastery has been the site of many weddings of royal families, both foreign and Spanish, including that of Edward I of England to Eleanor of Castile in 1254, for example. The defensive tower of the Abbey is also the birthplace of King Peter I of Castile.

The abbey was founded in 1187 by Alfonso VIII of Castile, at the behest of his wife, Eleanor of England, daughter of Henry II of England and Eleanor of Aquitaine. Until the 16th century, it enjoyed many royal privileges granted to it by the king, including exemption from taxes, the lordship of many villages and territories (governed by the monastery's abbess), and the possession of many of the royal families' valued personal items, most of them religious. It is even claimed that, until the Council of Trent, the abbess was able to hear confession and give absolution, like a priest.

In 1199 the monastery was incorporated into the Cistercian Order and became the burial place of the royal family. Constance, the youngest daughter of Alfonso, joined the Cistercians there. She was the first known as the Lady of Las Huelgas. This position was held as well by other women from the royal family, including her niece Constance and her grand-niece Berengaria, and maintained the close connection between the community and their royal patrons. Queen Eleanor and Queen Berengaria were both documented as supporting and being involved with the abbey.

Alfonso VIII, who was himself to be buried at Las Huelgas, along with his wife, Eleanor, created the affiliated Royal Hospital, with all its dependencies, subject to the Abbess. The hospital was founded to feed and care for the poor pilgrims along the Camino de Santiago. Donations made to sustain the hospital noted the key role that Eleanor played in its founding and maintenance, and she made many donations in honor of her deceased son Ferdinand.

A community of lay brothers developed to help the nuns in their care of the hospital's patients, who became known as the Brothers Hospitallers of Burgos. There were never more than a dozen of them, but they formed an independent religious Order in 1474. The Brothers survived as an Order until 1587, when their Order was suppressed and they were again placed under the authority of the abbess.

The Abbess of the monastery was, by the favor of the king, invested with almost royal prerogatives, and exercised an unlimited secular authority over more than fifty villages. Like secular lords, she held her own courts, in civil and criminal cases, and, like bishops, she granted Dimissorial Letters for ordination, and issued licenses authorizing priests within the territory of her abbatial jurisdiction to hear confessions, to preach, and to engage in pastoral care. She was privileged also to confirm the Abbesses of other monasteries, to impose censures, and to convoke synods. At a General Chapter of the Cistercians held in 1189, she was made Abbess General of the Order for the Kingdom of León and Castile, with the privilege of convoking annually a general chapter at Burgos.

The Abbess of Las Huelgas retained her ancient prerogatives up to the time of the Council of Trent, in the 16th century.

Currently, the monastic community, which at present numbers 36, is part of the Spanish Congregation of St. Bernard, a reform movement of Cistercian nuns, which arose during the 16th and 17th centuries. Due to this, they are also commonly referred to as "Bernadines". The nuns of this Congregation would follow a more exact observance of the Rule of St. Benedict than other Cistercian houses, with frequent and lengthy fasts, and celebrating the Divine Office about 2:00 A.M. The nuns support themselves through the decoration of porcelain items, making rosaries and providing laundry services for local hotels.

This abbey has founded a daughter house in Peru, the Monastery of the Most Holy Trinity, which is located in the agricultural Lurín District, on the outskirts of the Lima Metropolitan Area. The monastery has about ten professed nuns, and several candidates in various stages of formation. They support themselves by making cakes and jams, for which they use the produce of their own gardens.

Information about copyright

Rights characteristic / license

by-sa: CREATIVE COMMONS Attribution-ShareAlike

Link to the description of the license

creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/

Input taken over from:

Wikipedia contributors, 'Abbey of Santa María la Real de Las Huelgas', Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia, 13 October 2014, 22:49 UTC, <http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Abbey_of_Santa_Mar%C3%ADa_la_Real_de_Las_Huelgas&oldid=629501072> [accessed 15 March 2015]

taken over / edited on

15 Mar 2015

taken over / edited by

biroto-Redaktion

Hours of opening

Tuesday to Saturday: 10:00 to 13: 00h and 16:00 to 17: 30h
Sundays and holidays: 10: 30h to 14: 00h.
Closed: Monday; 1 and 6 January; Good Friday; May 1; Curpillos; 29 June; 6, 24, 25 and 31 December

 

13 km
0,0 km
876 m

 

ES-09003 Burgos

 

Hotel without restaurant (garni)

 
 

14 km
0,1 km
876 m

ES-09003 Burgos

 

Heritage building(s)/World heritage site

Vistas de la Catedral de Burgos
Burgos - Arco de Santa Maria
Historic City Centre of Burgos
Plaza Mayor de Burgos

Burgos ([ˈburɣos]) is a city in northern Spain, historic capital of Castile. It is situated on the confluence of the Arlanzón river tributaries, at the edge of the Iberian central plateau. It has about 180,000 inhabitants in the actual city and another 20,000 in the metropolitan area. It is the capital of the province of Burgos, in the autonomous community of Castile and León. The Burgos Laws or Leyes de Burgos which first governed the behaviour of Spaniards towards the natives of the Americas were promulgated here in 1512.

It has many historic landmarks, of particular importance; the Cathedral of Burgos (declared World Heritage Site by UNESCO in 1984) and the Cartuja of Miraflores. A large number of churches, palaces and other buildings from themedieval age remain. The city is surrounded by the Fuentes Blancas and the Paseo de la Isla parks.

The city forms the principal crossroad of northern Spain along the Camino de Santiago, which runs parallel to the River Arlanzón.

The Museum of Human Evolution was opened in 2010, unique in its kind across the world and projected to become one of the top 10 most-visited museums in Spain. The museum features the first Europeans, which lived in this area 800,000 years ago.

The Museum of Burgos summarizes the history of the province of Burgos. It has important objects and documents from all the ages, starting from Atapuerca, passing to the Romans and Iberians, and finishing in the contemporary period. The museum is located in a renascence palace, the House of Íñigo Angulo, which has a main patio that structures the museum.

Burgos is rich in ancient churches and convents. The three most notable are the cathedral, with its chapel of the Condestables de Castilla, the monastery of Las Huelgas, and the Carthusian monastery of Miraflores. Minor notable churches are San Esteban, San Gil (Sancti Aegidii), San Pedro, San Cosme y San Damián, Santiago (Sancti Jacobi), San Lorenzo and San Lesmes (Adelelmi). The Convento de la Merced, occupied by the Jesuits, and the Hospital del Rey are also of historic and architectural interest.

Among the other interesting architectural structures, in the walls of the city are the famous gateway of Santa María, erected for the first entrance of the Emperor Charles V, and the arch of Fernán González.

Burgos' Gothic Cathedral

Construction on Burgos' Gothic Cathedral began in 1221 and spanned mainly from the 13th to 15th centuries. It has been declared a UNESCO World Heritage Site. The west front is flanked by towers terminating in octagonal spires covered with open stonework traceries. The middle section, which serves as an entrance, has three alabaster pilasters, the intercolumnar spaces bearing panel-pictures representing the martyrdom of saints. The façade possessed ornate and fantastic surface decoration.

The octagonal chapel of the Condestable, in florid, thus highly sculpted, Gothic design, has a roof finished with balustraded turrets, needle-pointed pinnacles, and statues. In the lower portion, coats of arms, shields, and crouching lions have been worked into the ensemble. The exterior of the sacristy is decorated with carved traceries, figures of angels and armoured knights. The elaborate tabernacle is composed of two octagonal sections in Corinthian style.

Monasterio de las Huelgas Reales

The Monastery of the Royal Retreats on the outskirts of the city, was founded in 1180 by king Alfonso VIII, and was begun in a pre-Gothic style, although almost every style has been introduced over many additions. The remarkable cloisters have been described as "unrivalled for beauty both of detail and design, and perhaps unsurpassed by anything in its age and style in any part of Europe" (1911 Encyclopædia Britannica). One cloister has semicircular arches with delicate and varied columns; the other has an ogival style of early Gothic. The interior of the church has enormous columns supporting its magnificent vault; the entrance is modern. This convent historically benefited from extraordinary privileges granted to its abbess by kings and popes.

Historic centre

The city preserves its medievalhistoric centre, corresponding to the city walls.

Information about copyright

Rights characteristic / license

by-sa: CREATIVE COMMONS Attribution-ShareAlike

Link to the description of the license

creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/

Input taken over from:

Wikipedia contributors, 'Burgos', Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia, 2 October 2012, 06:07 UTC, http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Burgos&oldid=515581631 [accessed 29 October 2012]

taken over / edited on

29 Oct 2012 - 14 Jan 2017

taken over / edited by

biroto-Redaktion

Hours of opening

Cathedral

Daily from 9:30h to 18:30h.
Free: Tuesday from 16:30 h.

Museum of Human Evolution

From Tuesday to Friday from 10 to 14:30 and 16:30 to 20 h
Saturdays, Sundays and holidays from 10:00 to 20:00 h
Free: Wednesdays from 16:30h to 20h and Tuesday and Thursday from 19h to 20h

 

14 km
0,0 km
863 m

 

ES-9003 Burgos

 

Tourist information

Hours of opening

September 30 to June 30
from Monday to Saturday from 10:00 to 14:00 and 16:00 to 19:00
Sunday 10:00 to 17:00

July 1 to August 31
from Monday to Sunday 10:00 to 8:00 p.m.

 

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