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Cycle Route EuroVelo: Via Romea Francigena - part Canterbury-Rome

No. of cycle route EV5

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Elevation profile Cycle Route EuroVelo: Via Romea Francigena - part Canterbury-Rome

Added on 05 Oct 2011,

on 16 Feb 2020

Cycle route metrics

Total distance in km

2.508

Cumulative elevation gain in m

30.664

Avg. slope uphill in %

1,22

Cumulative elevation loss in m

30.652

GPS track data

Information about rights to the gps-track data

Rights owner

OpenStreetMap and Contributors + biroto-Redaktion (biroto.eu)

Rights characteristic / license

Contains information from OpenStreetMap, which is made available here under the Open Database License(ODbL)

Link to the description of the license

opendatacommons.org/licenses/odbl/

GPX file taken from

https://www.openstreetmap.org/relation/2764534

GPX file uploaded

by biroto-Redaktion on 16 Feb 2020

Track points in total

41.481

Track points per km (avg)

16

Start/endpoint

Start location

Canterbury, England, GB (17 m NHN)

End location

Vatican City, VA (29 m NHN)

Sources of information

Websites:

Books:

Connecting cycle path

Remarks

The route described here is compiled based on the route as published by EuroVelo(as of Nov. 2019). In doing so, parts of the EV5 published in OpenCycleMap and routes of the national or regional cycling networks were taken into account. If sections of the course as published at EuroVelo do not follow existing cycle routes, these sections have been filled up by self-created tracks.

The route can be considered resolved in UK, Belgium, Luxembourg, Germany, Lorraine/Alsace and in Switzerland. Signpostings of the EV4 are said to be in place in England, parts of Belgium and Luxembourg and in parts of Alsace (see EuroVelo). Moreover, the signs in the abovementioned regions are likely to correspond to the signs of the regional routes in the respective countries.

Beds4Cyclists, worth visiting and infrastructure

Name and address

Latitude / Longitude

Phone
Fax
Mobile

Type of accommodation

Route km
Dist. to route
Elevation AMSL

Rating for cyclists

 
 

0 km
0,0 km
19 m

GB-CT1 2JQ Canterbury

 

Heritage building(s)/World heritage site

Canterbury Cathedral
Canterbury, Westgate visible at the end of St Peterʹs St.
Great Gate of St. Augustineʹs Abbey
Weaverʹs House, Canterbury

Canterbury is a cathedral and university city in Kent, in the South East of England. Canterbury Cathedral is the seat of the Archbishop of Canterbury, Primate of All England and hence the Primus inter pares of the primates of each national church in the Anglican Communion and spiritual leader and senior clergyman of the Church of England.

Understand

Canterbury is a major tourist centre in the county of Kent. Even though it was bombed relentlessly during the Second World War (The Blitz), it still contains many ancient buildings, and modern building development within the medieval town centre is strictly regulated by officials at Canterbury.

As a result of the murder of Thomas Becket in 1170, Canterbury became a major centre of pilgrimage, the backdrop of Geoffrey Chaucer's Canterbury Tales, written in 1387 about pilgrims passing the time by sharing stories. There is a museum in Canterbury about the Tales.

Canterbury was founded as the Romano-Celtic town of Durovernum Cantiacorum. In the early Middle Ages, the city became known by the Anglo-Saxon name of Cantwarebyrig, meaning "fortress of the men of Kent".

See

Canterbury has an interesting mix of architectural styles, from genuine Tudor buildings to 1960s style office buildings. However there are architectural gems around every corner. There is no coherent style to the buildings as much of the city was demolished during bombing raids in World War II, but much has survived. The Canterbury Cathedral, St Augustine's Abbey, and St Martin's Church are inscribed on the UNESCO World Heritage List.

The Dane John Gardens (by the city walls and around the corner from the Whitefriars development) are full of surprises, hosting events almost every weekend during the summer months. Examples include French and farmers markets with all types of cuisine.

The subways on the east end of the main street have many paintings related to the Canterbury Tales.

Landmarks
  • Canterbury Cathedral +44 1227 762862. Summer M-Sa 09:00-17:30, Su 12:30 – 14:30; Winter M-Sa 09:00-17:00, Su 12:30 – 14:30; last entry 1/2 before closing time. 11 The Precincts. The burial place of King Henry IV and Edward the Black Prince, but most famous as the scene of the murder of Thomas Becket in 1170. The mostly Gothic-style cathedral is the seat of the Archbishop of Canterbury, Chief Primate of the Church of England and spiritual leader of the Anglican Communion. £10.50. Canterbury Cathedral on Wikipedia (updated Nov 2015)
  • Cathedral Close (a roothed passage leads from the N side of the Cathedral to the Green Court). An area surrounding the Cathedral around Green Court, including: (updated Nov 2015)
    • Norman staircase. 12th century roofed steps. (updated Dec 2015)
  • St Martin's Church, North Holmes Road (10 min. walk, E from the centre, via Longport),  +44 1227 768072. Tu,Th 11am-3pm, Sa 11am-4pm (summer), Su 9:50am-10:20am. it is a part of the World Heritage site (Roman Shrine). It is the oldest parish church in England still in constant use. If you look at the flint walls, you can still see the red brick that was used by the Romans. Worth seeing. Free admission. St Martin's Church, Canterbury on Wikipedia (updated Nov 2015)
  • St Augustine's Abbey, Longport, CT1 1PF,  +44 1227 767345. Nov-Mar Sa-Su 10:00-16:00; Apr-Oct unpublished. World Heritage remains preserved by English Heritage. adults £5.40, children £3.20, concessions £4.90. St Augustine's Abbey on Wikipedia (updated Nov 2015)
  • Canterbury Castle. from morning until dusk. The ruins of a Norman castle built in the 11th century. Free admission. Canterbury Castle on Wikipedia (updated Nov 2015)
Museums and Tourist Attractions
  • Canterbury Tales (Visitor Attraction "Medieval Misadventures"), St Margaret's Street,  +44 1227 479227. Daily (except Christmas Day) 10AM-5PM (with slight seasonal variations). One of Kent’s most popular attractions, a stunning reconstruction of 14th century England inside the historic building of St Margaret’s Church, based on the tales and characters of Chaucer's Canterbury Tales Adults £8.95. (updated Nov 2015)
  • West Gate Towers (West Gate Museum). 11AM-4PM. a small but fascinating collection of material about the tower and the history of Canterbury. The view from the open roof top is also excellent, allowing you to see up the high street all the way to the Cathedral. Adults £4. (updated Nov 2015)
  • Canterbury Roman Museum, Butchery Lane,  +44 1227 785575. M-Sa 10AM-5PM (last admission 4PM), from June-end October, also open Su 1:30PM-5PM (last admission 4PM). A remarkable museum of Roman period Canterbury. admission adults £2.80, concessions £1.75, family £7.20 (2 adults and up to 3 children), groups of 10+ 10% discount, teachers free. Canterbury Roman Museum on Wikipedia 
  • Canterbury Computer Gallery of Art, on the high street, is one of the few art galleries offering a (albeit very very small) selection of digital art.
  • The Beaney House of Art & Knowlege (Canterbury Royal Museum and Art Gallery),  +44 1227 452747. M-Su 10AM-5PM (closed Good Friday and Christmas week). With Buffs Regimental Museum, High Street. A splendid Victorian building housing decorative arts and picture collections, including a gallery for T.S. Cooper, England's finest cattle painter. The art gallery is the major space in the Canterbury area for the visual arts, with a wide-ranging annual program and exhibitions of both contemporary and historical work. The Buffs Museum tells the story of one of England's oldest infantry regiments and its worldwide service. There is an extensive collection of medals with Victoria Crosses and other gallantry awards. Admission free. Beaney House of Art and Knowledge on Wikipedia 
  • Sidney Cooper Gallery - A Christ Church linked University building, on the high street. Free entry. Combined music and art events often happen. Local art and merit gallery.
  • Canterbury Heritage Museum, Stour Street. Mon-Sat 11-16. From Roman settlement to Rupert Bear, see the history of Canterbury through fascinating objects, hands on displays and activities all set in the magnificent medieval Poor Priests' Hospital. Adults £8.00. Canterbury Heritage Museum on Wikipedia (updated Nov 2015)

Eat

Canterbury city centre is a veritable trove of low to mid range restaurants and cafés. Many different styles of cuisine are available at prices to suit most pockets.

  • Old Weavers Restaurant, 1 St Peters Street,  +44 1227 464660. A small restaurant located in an area that is sometimes referred to as "Little Italy". The Old Weavers is delightfully situated by one of the spurs of the River Stour and has patio area seating. The menu concentrates on minor variants of traditional English and Italian food. Main courses start from £4.95. 
  • Goods Shed, Station Road West,  +44 1227 459153. Housed in an airy converted engine shed, the adjoining farmers' market reassuring the visitor that the traditional cuisine will be of the best quality. Typical meals are the roast organic chicken with sorrel, chard and potatoes, or the vegetable platter, with mushrooms, black lentils, chard, hard-boiled egg, swede, tomato relish and salad leaves. Home-made desserts available also. Mains £8-16. 
  • Thomas Becket, 21 Best Lane,  +44 1227 464384. A small traditional pub in the city centre, offering excellent traditional British food. Be warned, they don't take credit/debit cards, only cash (Euros as well as Sterling) and cheques. 
  • Boho Cafe Bar, located towards the Westgate end of the highstreet. Bohemian cafe serving great food. Often packed with locals, both young and old.

Information about copyright

Rights characteristic / license

by-sa: CREATIVE COMMONS Attribution-ShareAlike

Link to the description of the license

creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/

Input taken over from:

Wikivoyage contributors, 'Canterbury (England)', Wikivoyage, The FREE worldwide travel guide that anyone can edit, 25 January 2017, 16:16 UTC, <https://en.wikivoyage.org/w/index.php?title=Canterbury_(England)&oldid=3132767> [accessed 16 February 2017]

taken over / edited on

16 Feb 2017 - 12 Apr 2018

taken over / edited by

biroto-Redaktion

 

0 km
0,7 km
19 m

GB-CT1 3PP Canterbury

 

Bike Lockers

9 bike lockers available.

 

0 km
0,4 km
21 m

GB-CT1 2SY Canterbury

 

Bike Lockers

Secure cycle storage facility operated by Cycles UK

 

0 km
0,1 km
29 m

 

GB-CT1 2RA Canterbury

 

Tourist information

  • Information about Canterbury, Whitstable and Herne Bay and the surrounding area
  • Tickets for top attractions
  • Guided tours of the city - including walking and river tours
  • A large range of maps, brochures and guides.

Information about copyright

Rights characteristic / license

by-sa: CREATIVE COMMONS Attribution-ShareAlike

Link to the description of the license

creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/

taken over / edited on

17 Feb 2017

taken over / edited by

biroto-Redaktion

Hours of opening

The visitor centre is open 7 days a week all year except Christmas Day and Boxing Day and New Years Day.

Monday to Wednesday 9am to 5pm
Thursday 9am to 7pm
Friday and Saturday 9am to 5pm
Sunday 10am to 5pm

Languages spoken:

English


 

19 km
0,0 km
61 m

GB-CT15 7JJ Barfrestone

 

Church/cathedral

St Nicholas, Barfrestone, Kent
St Nicholas, Barfrestone, Kent

The Grade I listed Norman church, which contains significant carvings around door portals, the bell in the adjacent yew tree, and "Little Ewell", a converted rectory which, until 2013, was the location of the centre (house, offices and workshops) of the L'Arche Kent Community which has since moved to Canterbury.

Information about copyright

Rights characteristic / license

by-sa: CREATIVE COMMONS Attribution-ShareAlike

Link to the description of the license

creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/

Input taken over from:

Wikipedia contributors, 'Barfrestone', Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia, 13 September 2019, 14:32 UTC, <https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Barfrestone&oldid=915481307> [accessed 24 November 2019]

taken over / edited on

25 Nov 2019

taken over / edited by

biroto-Redaktion

 

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