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Cycle Tour PRG-KV-DE

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Elevation profile Cycle Tour PRG-KV-DEVyšehradZámek vDobřichovicíchHrad KarlštejnKrálovský hrad KřivoklátKlášterec nad OhříKadaňLibočanyLounyZámek LibochoviceKlášter DoksanyTerezínHrad StřekovDěčínFestung KönigsteinSchlossSonnensteinSchlossPillnitzDre...100300500700900050100150200250300350400450500

Added on 15 Jul 2020,

on 15 Jul 2020

Cycle route metrics

planned

ridden

Total distance in km

502

0

Cumulative elevation gain in m

6.379

0

Avg. slope uphill in %

1,27

-

Cumulative elevation loss in m

6.467

0

GPS track data

Information about rights to the gps-track data

Rights owner

zoltar & biroto-Contributors

Rights characteristic / license

cc0: Public Domain no Rights reserved

Link to the description of the license

creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/

GPX file taken from

https://www.biroto.eu/

GPX file uploaded

by zoltar on 15 Jul 2020

Track points in total

7.110

0

Track points per km (avg)

14

0

Start/endpoint

Start location

Prague, Prague, CZ (203 m NHN)

End location

Dresden, Sachsen, DE (115 m NHN)

Beds4Cyclists, worth visiting and infrastructure

Name and address

Latitude / Longitude

Phone
Fax
Mobile

Type of accommodation

Rating for cyclists

Route km
Dist. to route
Elevation

 
 

0 km
1,7 km
204 m

Old Town / Altstadt
CZ-110 00 Praha

 

Old town/World heritage site

Prag, Altstadtplatz
Prag, Altstadtplatz
Prag, Rathaus am Altstädter Ring
Prag, Rathaus am Altstädter Ring
Palác Granovských z Granova
Palác Granovských z Granova
Prague, Charles Bridge as seen from the Vltava River
Prague, Charles Bridge as seen from the Vltava River

Old Town and Josefov

The right bank section of District Prague 1, the oldest settled area, consists of the Old Town of Prague Wikivoyage Icon (Czech: Staré město) and the Jewish Town (Czech: Josefov).

Understand

The Jewish Quarter lends itself to exploration, contemplation and a deeper understanding of what Prague's Jews have endured throughout the centuries. Paradoxically, Adolf Hitler is to thank for the Quarter's continued existence - he intended to create an "Exotic Museum of an Extinct Race" here after the end of the war.

See

  • Old Town Square (Staroměstské náměstí) is the center of eventful history of Prague. The Gothic, Renaissance and Baroque buildings were preserved here. The Historical Centre, including most of the city’s major sites, became a UNESCO-listed site in 1992. 
  • Jan Hus monument (Pomník mistra Jana Husa). That striking man standing atop a patina-green metal mountain in the center of Old Town Square is not Jesus, though he resembles him. It's Jan Hus, the great Czech religious reformer whose Hussite movement caused as much, if not more, friction within the Christian community as Martin Luther.
  • Astronomical Clock (Pražský orloj). The Astronomical Clock located on a side tower of the Old Town Hall (reasonably enough, on Old Town Square) is easy to find - just wait until a few minutes before the hour and look for a large group of tourists standing around waiting for something to happen! It also one of the most popular gathering places in Prague.
    Built in 1410 and thought of as an example of 15th century hi-tech device, projected with participation of math and astronomy professor at Prague University. The mail dial is in principle mechanical astrolabe, showing not only the current time, but also the placement of Sun and Moon in Zodiac, phase of the moon, time of sunrise and sunset, length of astronomical night, time in old Bohemian hours, in unequal hours and other data. From gathering crowds, hardly anybody understands all data astronomical dial displays.
    Then there is a slow-moving 12-month calendar with incredibly delicate, small figure paintings by 19th century Czech painter Josef Manes. Every day on the hour, the upper, glockenspiel-style section of the clock performs the same scene: Death waves an hourglass, the 12 apostles shuffle past small windows, and a rooster crows. After the hour strikes, a Turk wags his head.
  • Municipal Hall (Obecní dům),  +420 222 002101. Nám. Republiky 5. The Obecní dům was built near the Powder Tower (a storage place for gunpowder and a major trade route entry into the city) on a site called King's Court where once a royal residence stood. In 1901, the Prague Civic Society made a proposal to city authorities to build a center for official and social Czech events. 
  • Convent of St Agnes, U Milosrdných 17. The Anezsky klaster is the first Early Gothic building in Prague (founded 1234) - something notable in a city filled with amazingly well-preserved examples of Gothic architecture such as St Vitus, the Charles Bridge and the Powder Tower. Over the years the complex's convent, chapels and several churches deteriorated and in some cases, were completely destroyed. After Habsburg emperor Josef II's religious reforms, the convent was shut down in 1782 and converted into lodgings for the poor. Today, the convent is used to house part of the Czech National Gallery's collection. Admission: Full: 100 Kč, Reduced: 50 Kč, Family: 150 Kč. 
  • Museum of Communism, Na Příkope 10,  +420 224 212966. Hours: Daily 9AM-9PM excluding December 24. An interesting museum that follows the history of communism in Czech Republic until its fall with the Velvet Revolution. The museum has several interesting communist propaganda artifacts, which are worth a look. Interesting exhibits on how communism changed Czechoslovakia, but skewed toward a particular view of history. Admission: Adults: 180 Kč, Students with ID: 140Kč, Children (under 10 with paying adult): Free. 
  • Mucha Museum, Kaunický palác, Panská 7,  +420 224 216415. Hours: 10AM-6PM. This museum is dedicated to the life and works of Alphonse Mucha, a leading artist in the Art Nouveau movement. 
  • Museum of Czech Cubism, Ovocný trh 19,  +420 224 211746. Hours: 10AM-6PM. Closed M. The Museum of Czech Cubism is in the recently renovated House of the Black Madonna. This unique Cubist building, designed by Josef Gočár, was built in 1911–1912. Adult: 100 Kč. Discounts: 50 Kč. 
  • Czech Museum of Fine Arts, Husova 19-21, Praha 1. 20th century Czech art and changing exhibitions. 
  • Museum of Decorative Arts, 17 listopadu 2, Praha 1. This 17th century palazzo-style building houses examples of historical and contemporary crafts, as well as applied arts and design. 
  • Jewish Museum, U Staré školy 1,  +420 222 749211. This is not a single site but consists of four synagogues, the Old Jewish Cemetery and the Memorial Hall - entrance to all being covered by a single ticket. A combined ticket that includes the Old-New Synagogue can be obtained at a considerable extra cost but the interest of the building justifies it. 
    • Maisel Synagogue.  
    • Spanish Synagogue, Vězeňská 1. The Spanish Synagogue, so-called because Sephardic Jews expelled from Spain at the end of the 15th century built a previous synagogue on this site, is a wild combination of neo-Renaissance and Moorish-Spain style. Think the Alhambra crossed with a Victorian wallpaper store, with some Islamic geometric and floral flourishes thrown in for good measure. The predominant color is red, which lends a regal aura to the interior, but there are also multiple shades of green and blue. The background behind the altar is blue covered with gold stars, visually implying the intercession of the deity in the holy space of the building, drawing one's eyes upward to the vast ceiling. 
    • Pinkas Synagogue, Siroká ulice 3,  +420 222 326660. Hours: November - March: 9 - 16:30. April - October: 9 - 18:00. Closed Saturday (Jewish Sabbath) and Jewish holidays. Inside the front door of the Pinkas Synagogue, inscribed in tiny red and black letters on almost every square inch of wallspace are the names of 77,297 Jews who were killed in the war. This visual representation humanizes such a number, attaching names to the statistics.
    • Old Jewish Cemetery (Starý Židovský Hřbitov), Siroká ulice. On the left wall before the entrance is a plaque detailing conservation efforts (which cost 1 million crowns per year). Over 20,000 people are buried in about twelve layers of graves, stacked to save space. Avigdor Kara is the earliest known person buried here - he was a poet who lived to tell about the 1389 pogrom. The reddish, grey and black tombstones are tilted at crazy angles, some covered with moss, some newly cleaned. Walking along the path that winds around the perimeter, Rabbi Loew's tombstone is about halfway through. It has a lion on it and a plaque on the wall across from it. Loew is known as the father of the Golem legend in Prague. 
    • Klausen Synagogue.  
    • Ceremonial Hall.  
  • Old-New Synagogue (Staronová synagóga), Maiselova 18. The name sounds strange for a building from the 13th century but it was called 'New' to distinguish it from an even older synagogue. This was replaced by the Spanish Synagogue in the 17th century, when the Old-New Synagogue acquired its current name. 
  • Church of the Holy Ghost. Baroque church 
  • Pariska Street (Pařížská). Tree lined street with number of historic buildings, exclusive shopping and upmarket restaurants and hotels. 
  • Jewish Town Hall (Židovská radnice), Maiselova 250/18. Renaissance style building 
  • Rudolfinum, Alšovo nábřeží 12,  +420 227 059352. Neo-Renaissance style auditorium, home of the Czech Philharmonic Orchestra. 
  • Jaroslav Fragner Gallery. Contemporary architecture. You can find here profiles of influential people and groups, retrospective exhibitions, thematic exhibitions, recent movement in architecture. Gallery provides lectures, seminars and publishing, regarding central Prague. The JFG is a centre for architects, professional and general public, students of architecture and construction companies. 
  • Postal museum (Poštovní muzeum), Nové mlýny 1239/2,  +420 222 312006.  

Information about copyright

Rights characteristic / license

by-sa: CREATIVE COMMONS Attribution-ShareAlike

Link to the description of the license

creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/

Input taken over from:

Wikivoyage contributors, 'Prague/Old Town and Josefov', Wikivoyage, The FREE worldwide travel guide that anyone can edit, 13 August 2016, 15:01 UTC, https://en.wikivoyage.org/w/index.php?title=Prague/Old_Town_and_Josefov&oldid=3033290 Wikivoyage Icon [accessed 12 October 2016]

taken over / edited on

12 Oct 2016 - 13 Mar 2021

taken over / edited by

biroto-Redaktion

 

0 km
4,7 km
178 m

 

CZ-171 00 Praha

 

Camping

 

0 km
4,4 km
171 m

 

CZ-170 00 Praha

 

Boardinghouse / guest house

 

0 km
4,0 km
182 m

 

CZ-170 00 Praha

 

Hotel

 
 

0 km
1,2 km
227 m

Prague/Castle and Lesser Town
CZ-118 00 Praha

 

Old town/World heritage site

Prag, Blick auf den Hradschin (Hradčany) mit Burg
Prag, Blick auf den Hradschin (Hradčany) mit Burg
Prag, St.-Veits-Dom
Prag, St.-Veits-Dom
Prag, Palais Lobkowicz
Prag, Palais Lobkowicz

Castle and Lesser Town are both in district Prague 1, Castle district of Prague Wikivoyage Icon (Czech: Hradčany.) is the highest part of the city while the Lesser Town of Prague (Czech: Malá Strana) is the lower area on the left bank.

Understand

Prague Castle is the symbol of the Czech state. It became the seat of Bohemian dukes in the 9th century. Since then, the Prague Castle had been continually the seat of ruler of the Czech lands, from kings of Bohemia to Czechoslovak and Czech presidents. According to the Guinness Book of Records, Prague Castle is the largest ancient castle in the world. Castle complex is a unique mixture of different architecural styles. From romanesque St. George's Basilica, gothic St. Vitus cathedral, renaissance Belvedere with gardens to adjustments by well-known architects form 20th century.

Under the Castle is Lesser Town. Founded in 13th century, this part of Prague was inhabited mostly by Germans. Lesser Town was destroyed during the Hussite Rebellion, therefore Baroque architecture predominants there.

See

The main attraction of Hradčany (Castle Quarter or Castle District) is the Prague Castle itself. However the Castle Quarter is much larger and is filled with many other attractions, palaces, churches and monasteries. Some of the palaces host excellent galleries, others are used as government or church buildings.

Some of the areas require you to buy a ticket for entrance. You can buy one of two combined tickets. The short tour allows entrance to the Old Royal Palace, St. George's Basilica, Golden Lane and Daliborka Tower for 250 Kč. The long tour allows entry to all the same places as the short tour, as well as "The Story of Prague Castle" exhibition, the National Gallery display in the Convent of St. George, and the Prague Castle Picture Gallery all for 350 Kč. The entry to the St. Vithus Cathedral is free (but crowds are regulated) when the owned by the state, but money is charged when owned by the Catholic church. The legal battle over the ownership of the cathedral still continues.

  • Prague Castle (Pražský Hrad). The former seat of the King and is now the seat of the Czech president. This is Prague's number one tourist attraction so expect huge crowds and possibly long lines, especially during high tourist season. Your best bet is to come early, as soon as the castle opens.
    Similar to other royal palaces, there is an hourly changing of the guard ceremony. At noon, the ceremony includes fanfare at a flag ceremony in the first courtyard. 
  • St. Vitus Cathedral (Katedrala svateho Vita). In the center of the castle and the most important cathedral in all of the Czech republic. The oldest parts of the cathedral are from the 14th century, but the cathedral was not completed in the Medieval period. The highest tower was completed in Renaissance and Baroque styles much later, as is clearly obvious. The Western portal and both Western towers are even younger, completed in the 19th and early 20th centuries. However, the original Medieval plans were used for them and their relatively small age is not obvious. St. Vitus Cathedral was the place of royal coronations and also the location of the remains of several famous Czech Kings (notably Charles IV, of Charles Bridge fame).
  • Old Royal Palace (Starý královský palác). The original seat of Czech rulers. Visitors first enter the Vladislav hall, the largest high-Gothic vaulted space in Central Europe. Other rooms include the Palace chapel and throne room. At the end of the exhibit is "The Story of Prague Castle" exhibit, which features artificats from the castle's past. 
  • St. George's Basilica. The second oldest church in the castle and features a colorful Baroque facade. The interior is visibly older and is the burial place of the Premyslid family and the first Czech saint, Princess Ludmila. 
  • St. George's Convent - National Gallery. One of several branches of the National Gallery is located inside this, the first convent in Bohemia. Today it houses the collection of Czech Mannerist and Baroque art. 
  • The Golden Lane (Zlatá ulička). During the reign of Rudolf II, goldsmiths lived in a lively alleyway filled with tiny workshops, which were also their residence, hence its name. Tiny, cobblestoned walkway filled with brightly-painted little houses, where modern man has a hard time standing with the low ceiling. Franz Kafka occupied No. 22 from 1916 to 1917, and this is why most people visit the Golden Lane. There really isn't another good reason unless you want to buy some overpriced souvenirs in the small shops now occupying the houses, or need to cut through the crowds to see the Daliborka.
  • The Daliborka. Built by Prince Vladislav in 1496, the tower at the far end of the castle is part of a new fortified wall. Its first prisoner was a recalcitrant knight named Dalibor who, according to legend, played his violin very sadly at the wall serenading the castle residents. Though, the thickness of the walls makes that legend a little unlikely. No one would have been able to hear him outside! Today the tower holds a small display of prison and torture techniques used during that time. 
  • Prague Castle Picture Gallery. Housed in the original castle stables. It contains Renaissance and Baroque art, including parts of the original collection of Rudolph II. 
  • The Royal Garden. To the east/north-east of the palace is a large park. Aside from its own beauty, it has an excellent view of the east bank of the river. Entrance is free. 
  • The State Rooms at Prague Castle. Open to the public two days of the year, as they are mostly used exclusively by the President. Contact the Castle Information office for more details. 
  • Charles Bridge (Karlův Most). connects the Old Town with Lesser Town. Commissioned by Czech king and Holy Roman Emperor Charles IV and constructed between 1357 and 1402, it is one of the most interesting historical stone bridges in Europe. It is 516 meters long with 16 arches. Baroque statues (a total of 30) began to be placed here in the 17th century. The best time to visit the bridge is in the quiet morning or in the evening at sunset, when one can enjoy a view of the fully lit Prague Castle. 
  • Wallenstein Palace (Valdštejnský palác) is a Baroque palace, currently the home of the Czech Senate. The original Palace was built in years 1623-1630 by Albrecht von Wallenstein, Duke of Mecklenburg (1583-1634), who made his name and fortune as the Commander-in-Chief of the Imperial forces in the Thirty Years War.
  • Child Jesus of Prague, Karmelitská 385/9 (Church of Our Lady Victorious of Discalced Carmelite Order). This image of Christ, known also as the Holy Infant of Prague, is among the most widespread religious images in the world. The statue was brought from Spain in the 16th century and given to the Carmelites in 1628. It is 47 cm high and represents Jesus as a Child and King. The statue is carved out of wood and the surface is modeled in coloured wax. The entrance to the church is free of charge. 
  • Petrin Hill. Due to a housing crunch, most young Czechs don't move out of their parents' house until they marry (sometimes long after!) This lack of privacy leads to some very public displays of affection - what you see on the metro or trams won't compare to what you’re likely to encounter on Petrin Hill. This hillside slopes down from the Castle and Strahov Monastery to Mala Strana and Malostranske namesti metro station. It affords an amazing view of the city on a clear day, and in springtime the trees are all in bloom. This is possibly the nicest place to kick back with a bottle of wine and your significant other to watch the sun set over the city. Petrin has a miniature Eiffel Tower that offers a nice view over Prague and its suburbs.
    • Petřínská rozhledna. A smaller version of the Eiffel Tower on the top of Petrin Hill overlooking Prague. Climbing the tower costs 105 Kč for a standard ticket or 55 Kč for discounts. Paid lift available. 
  • Loreta. A beautiful Baroque convent in the Lesser Town. 
  • Franz Kafka Museum, Cihelná 2b,  +420 257 535507. Influences, life and works of the German language writer. 
  • The Pedagogical Comenius Museum, Valdštejnská 20, Praha 1. A museum documenting the writings of the Czech Renaissance erudite. 
  • Lobkowicz Palace, Jiřská 3. 10:00-18:00. Art museum near Prague Castle. Houses the original manuscript for Beethoven's famous 5th symphony, and many other interesting artifacts. 275 crowns. 
  • Museum Kampa. A museum of modern Central European art. 

Information about copyright

Rights characteristic / license

by-sa: CREATIVE COMMONS Attribution-ShareAlike

Link to the description of the license

creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/

Input taken over from:

Wikivoyage contributors, 'Prague/Castle and Lesser Town', Wikivoyage, The FREE worldwide travel guide that anyone can edit, 11 September 2016, 14:25 UTC, <https://en.wikivoyage.org/w/index.php?title=Prague/Castle_and_Lesser_Town&oldid=3048887> [accessed 13 October 2016]

taken over / edited on

13 Oct 2016

taken over / edited by

biroto-Redaktion

 

busy

 


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